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FAB - your route to persuasion success

Whether you’re selling a product or just an idea, persuading the other person to your way of thinking is crucial to getting them to act.

If they don’t care, they won’t act.

Often, though, they would care, if only they fully understood what’s in it for them, what they’ll get out of it.

Unfortunately, they don’t always get to that point of understanding.

Enter FAB.

FAB – Features, Advantages and Benefits – is a framework to help you convert someone from a passive spectator into an active buyer of what you’re selling them.

  • Features – these are the “what” of your offer, the simple facts of it.
  • Advantages – these are the things the specific features allow one to do
  • Benefits – these are why the advantages matter to the person you’re selling to

The last part, benefits, is the most crucial part.

Effectively, it takes the buyer from “OK, so?” to “I need this!“.

It is also the part that most people miss when they’re trying to convince someone to take a buying action.

(remember, a buying action could be buying into an idea – like going out for dinner – not just buying a product)

Let’s use an example to highlight how FAB might be used.

Imagine you’re selling your boss on the idea of working from home:

  • Feature – you’ll no longer be in the office
  • Advantage – there’ll be no resource of materials or space needed for you at the office
  • Benefit – the company will save money (which means more profit for your boss’s bonus…)

N.B. if you’re planning on selling your boss on the idea of working from home, you’ll likely need more than this single FAB alone! 🙂

Take something more simple; a tea cup:

  • Feature – it has a handle
  • Advantage – you can pick up the cup by the handle, not only by the cup itself
  • Benefit – you can enjoy a lovely cup of tea without burning your hand trying to pick it up

When you want to persuade someone of something, first think of it in terms of FABs, drill down to how it benefits the other person (how you’re giving value).

This gives you the most important part you want them to understand; what’s in it for them.

The more personally you can relate this to someone, the more bespoke it is, the stronger your chances of success.

So put yourself in their shoes, work out what’s the real benefit to them, then guide them towards that, using features and advantages as mere stepping stones.

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